WHC Bahrain 2018

World Heritage Committee Session 42

24 June - 4 July 2018 | Manama, Bahrain

Every year, the UNESCO World Heritage Committee meets to consider applications for the World Heritage List - a list which recognises sites around the world with special cultural or physical significance. The Committee also requests states to take action when heritage sites are not being properly managed, allocates financial assistance to help look after them, and recognises when heritage sites are in danger - for instance as a result of conflict, development or climate change.

But who decides what of our heritage has "special cultural or physical significance"?  The Committee has been criticised, for example, for favouring Eurocentric values, and for favouring some sites over others for political reasons.  Our heritage forms a key part of our cultural identities, so the Committee has a pretty significant responsibility.

Of course, it's only appropriate that our delegates should visit some real-life World Heritage Sites too - so as well as the Committee Session, they'll see Sites in Bahrain while they're away.


KEY INFO

DEPARTS AKL - 20 June
RETURNS TO AKL - 7 July

TRAINING WEEKEND - 16-17 June

APPLICATIONS DUE - 29 May

DELEGATION FEE - $5500


Head Delegate

Katie Cammell

KATIE CAMMELL

Katie is a BA (Hons) student in History at the University of Auckland, working on a project related to Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its expression in educational, academic, and public history. Alongside her studies, she works as a Student Adviser in the Faculty of Arts and as a Research Assistant in the university’s Public Policy Institute. She also volunteers as an Academic Mentor in the university’s student accommodation, as a Content Writer for the Public Policy Club, and as Vice President for the University of Auckland History Society. In her spare time, Katie enjoys photography, baking, and playing with her cat, Isabella Queen of France (aka Izzy). Katie is excited to attend WHC S42 to see how ideas of cultural heritage and what is considered ‘valuable’ are expressed and debated during the conference.

Delegates

  MEREKARA KARA   Teenaa koutou katoa. Merekara Kara is a University of Otago graduate, Bachelor of Commerce, majoring in Tourism and a Bachelor of Arts, majoring in Maaori Studies. She was and has always been encouraged to learn and involve herself in her Maaori heritage on her father's side. This encouragement has instilled in her a pride to identify and live as a young, confident Maaori waahine. After all her experiences, both good and bad, living in two worlds - as both Paakehaa and Maaori, she stands firm in who she is. Her future aspirations are to involve herself or create cultural heritage ventures within her homeland of Cambridge - showcasing her tribe's history and modern-day activities. She is very interested in attending this conference as it encompasses all of her interests and passions - learning about heritage, observing diplomacy in action and looking after the environment for the future generations to come. This would be a great opportunity to put her tertiary learning into practice and gain memorable experiences.

MEREKARA KARA

Teenaa koutou katoa. Merekara Kara is a University of Otago graduate, Bachelor of Commerce, majoring in Tourism and a Bachelor of Arts, majoring in Maaori Studies. She was and has always been encouraged to learn and involve herself in her Maaori heritage on her father's side. This encouragement has instilled in her a pride to identify and live as a young, confident Maaori waahine. After all her experiences, both good and bad, living in two worlds - as both Paakehaa and Maaori, she stands firm in who she is. Her future aspirations are to involve herself or create cultural heritage ventures within her homeland of Cambridge - showcasing her tribe's history and modern-day activities. She is very interested in attending this conference as it encompasses all of her interests and passions - learning about heritage, observing diplomacy in action and looking after the environment for the future generations to come. This would be a great opportunity to put her tertiary learning into practice and gain memorable experiences.

  MANU LATU   As a young Māori and Tongan woman Manu’s culture is something she values most dearly, it has been an essence of her life growing up in Otara, South Auckland and a cornerstone to her success in becoming the leader she is today. She is proud and fortunate to have grown up with three cultural lenses making her truly see the value of preserving culture in both her life and those around her.

MANU LATU

As a young Māori and Tongan woman Manu’s culture is something she values most dearly, it has been an essence of her life growing up in Otara, South Auckland and a cornerstone to her success in becoming the leader she is today. She is proud and fortunate to have grown up with three cultural lenses making her truly see the value of preserving culture in both her life and those around her.